Rethinking Success

With Guest Blogger, Alberta Regional Minister Dennis Stone

There are a multitude of voices and assumptions, both historical and cultural, on what constitutes a successful church plant. In today’s blog, we hear from Alberta Regional Minister Dennis Stone and his gained wisdom in the metrics we use to determine a “successful” new community or church plant. ~Shannon

Everyone is behind Church Planting, but as the Alberta Regional Minister I’d like to put a twist on our perception of it. Usually we think of Church Planting as an effort to have a ministry group form, develop finance and worship structures, support a pastor, gain a church building and become fully independent. Those elements are often how successful church planting is perceived.

CBWC Gathering 2017.5.25-158.jpg

Dennis.

In Alberta at the present time we are working with several worshipping congregations that are far from being independent as listed above. These are, however, vibrant congregations hungry for the Word of God, discipling and evangelizing … all on a level that would be outstanding for any of our established churches. In Alberta at the present time we have groups meeting for worship intentionally seeking association with the CBWC (not just meeting in CBWC buildings) in the following languages: Birundi, Karen, KaChin, and Haitian/Creole (Bonnie Doon-Edm). These situations do not include already affiliated groups that serve immigrant communities such a Premiere Eglise d’Expression Francaise de Calgary (PEEEFC) a Haitian group, or Greenhills Christian Fellowship that effectively ministers to those from the Philippines, nor does it include the efforts of FBC Calgary in providing ministry for Spanish and Ethiopian ministries or Westview Baptist in providing ministry for Japanese, Arabic and Deaf (sign language) ministries.

In the new year it looks like we may have another Spanish congregation to work with in Edmonton. Our Calgary Korean church is an exception–independent and healthy, effectively ministering for decades in the Korean language.

These congregations almost always work on a shoestring budget while renting facilities. They usually have pastors who serve out of the goodness of their heart with little financial return for their efforts. Few of these worshipping congregations will ever be fully independent or successful church plants in the traditional sense, but the CBWC cannot stop helping these ministries that do evangelism, immigrant integration, worship in a known language, and intentional mission work within our Canadian borders.

Shannon’s note: Consider how you might join where God is working in some of our new ethnic specific churches as they struggle financially. CBWC and Church Planting are committed to these groups as they do the good work of sharing faith and worship as they gather and as they scatter. Contact us to become a Venture Partner to encourage our brothers and sisters who need the body of Christ so they do not become discouraged in their labour. The apostle Paul in 2 Corinthians 8, commends the Macedonian church, who even in the midst of their own financial lack, pleaded to share with other saints who were also doing the work of the kingdom of God. And along with Paul, I praise God that we have and can have the privilege of seeing generosity extended among our family of churches.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s