About

Canadian Baptists of Western Canada Church Planting is committed to a vision of

Inviting Faith
Acting in Mercy
Cultivating Leaders

by reaching communities for Jesus Christ through planting new churches.

We are committed to fulfilling the Great Commission of Matthew 28: going out into the world to making disciples. It is deeply important to us to share the love of God through evangelism and acts of mercy and justice.

Our vision is to rapidly multiply the number of Christians worshiping in our churches. And that means multiplying our churches too. Go West!

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Recent Posts

Go… But First, Wait

As our period of 77 Days of Prayer and Discernment draws to a close, I want to share an article about how in order to be Christ’s sent ones, we must first listen and wait on Him. These past 11 weeks, we’ve been leaning into this calling to go, but first wait, so I hope you will be encouraged by this article! ~Cailey Morgan

 

wait-saturate.jpg

 

By Ben Connelly, saturatetheworld.com
And while staying with them he ordered them not to depart from Jerusalem,
but to wait for the promise of the Father, which, he said, “you heard from me; for John
baptized with water, but you will be baptized  with the Holy Spirit not many days from now.”
 So when they had come together, they asked him, “Lord, will you at this time restore
 the kingdom to Israel?” He said to them, “It is not for you to know times or seasons
 that the Father has fixed by his own authority. But you will receive power when
 the Holy Spirit has come upon you, and you will be my witnesses in
 Jerusalem and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the earth.”

My Biggest Failure

“What’s been your biggest missional failure?” That’s a question I asked many respected, experienced church planters during a series of interviews in 2014. Some chuckled as they shared a personal embarrassment; others told laugh-out-loud stories of tactical mistakes.

But one response was different from the rest. It was totally unexpected, and has stuck with me for over three years now: the pastor became stone-faced sober and said, My biggest failure by a country mile was berating God’s people to mission, as opposed to letting the gospel win their hearts, by the Spirit, for mission. I hammered them with the obligations of the gospel, without winning their hearts with the glorious things that God has done for them. They could only sustain living missionally for either short bursts of time, or for a longer time but then they eventually gave up thru weariness. Because Christ wasn’t continually refreshing their hearts. That was by far my biggest fail.”

As church planters and pastors, mission is woven into the very fabric of our roles and our lives. We are charged with loving neighbors; we spend our days and weeks trying to “go, make disciples”; we long to see our cities redeemed. And we spend endless hours pouring ourselves out to those ends. After all, one of the most known verses in the Bible is in Acts’ opening scene, where Jesus’ commands his first followers: “You will be my witnesses in Jerusalem and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the earth…” (1:8). That’s our life, right, church planters?

But that’s not actually the first command Jesus gives in that paragraph.

Waiting

The first command in the book of Acts, which is rarely even spoken of, is in verse 4, “[Jesus] ordered them not to depart from Jerusalem, but to wait for the promise of the Father” – which, he makes clear, is “the Holy Spirit” who comes upon us with the only power that can make our “going” and our “witnessing” possible (1:4-8, italics added).

In other words, Jesus’ first marching orders, to the small band of apostles and disciples on whom the fate of global Christianity rested, were, “Stop.” “Wait.” “Don’t go.”

It seems shocking – but the point is one that many of us, who love our neighbors and feel the urgency of God’s mission, need to heed. We cannot go; we cannot accomplish anything; we cannot rightly witness – if God doesn’t show up, empower us, and do what only God can do. Here’s the beauty: God promises us his Spirit in Acts 1, and in Acts 2, God fulfills that promise. The Spirit comes at Pentecost, people begin getting saved, and then God (through both human choice and human suffering) disperses his church throughout Jerusalem, Judea, Samaria, and well beyond. God does charge us to make disciples, but only after we wait on him.

For some of us, that’s a needed breath of fresh air. For some, it’s a humbling truth. For some, it’s a lifeline as we feel like we’re drowning. Let’s learn from the interviewee’s warning. Let’s rest in God’s Word for ourselves and for those in our churches. Let’s be about the heart, the gospel, the “glorious things God has done,” and the Spirit more than the obligations, the actions, the berating, and even the “going” itself. Jesus sends us to be witnesses, but if we go without reliance, dependence, and the filling that only his Spirit can offer, we’ve missed the point completely.

This is my prayer for each of us: that our participation in God’s mission would be patient, prayerful, joy-filled, and free – even restful(!), because our role is simply obedience, as we wait on the Lord and follow his lead.

This guest post is originally found at at saturatetheworld.com.

I saw a great re-post of a tweet attributed to Eugene Peterson – “Waiting in prayer is a disciplined refusal to act before God acts.” We’ve written lots about watching for where God is already at work and joining Him there and I love the phrasing of “disciplined refusal,” but as this article reminded us, it is by the empowerment of the Holy Spirit that we are able to act at all.  Before we can gospel others, we must first be a people whose hearts and mission are “fanned into flame” because we embrace the gospel message ourselves in such a way as we cannot contain the hope, peace, joy and love overflowing from within ourselves and our church communities. And sometimes that means we have to wait in prayer to discover this. In this Advent season, how will you practice this discipline, remembering that waiting is not stopping activity, it is increasing prayer and discernment? ~ Shannon Youell

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