Ash Wednesday Reflection: Becoming a Prayer Pupil

By Cailey Morgan

It’s been such a joy to participate for the past several weeks in the Orienting to God collective prayer series with CBWC churches. I believe that prayer is the most important way we can spend our time, so I am grateful to be invited into rhythms that foster both corporate and personal prayer. And now, as today is Ash Wednesday, we are given an opportunity to again engage in shared practices with congregations all around the world. 

Perhaps Lent is a good time to reflect on the tools that have been helpful in deepening our prayer lives in the past, and also look to how we will order our future in a way that prioritizes communion with God. 

Mentors in Prayer 
As a young teen, I was introduced to the practice of journaling by Linda, a youth leader who found deep connection with God through the physical method of writing to process her experiences and formulate her prayers. She showed me her journal and talked about what the process meant in her walk with God, and then even took me to London Drugs to buy my first notebook and helped me decorate it with silly photos and a fancy cover.  

A few of my journals. They’re much messier on the inside!

Looking back, I can attest that most of the profound moments in the “individual” facet of my prayer life have been grounded in putting pen to paper.  

But Linda’s not the only person who has opened wide their prayer life for me to learn from. Consider the breadth of emotion and depth of prayer that can be found in the (over 70!) Psalms of David that have been collected in Scripture: joy, desperation, awe, anxiety and depression, praise, contrition, and the list goes on.

When my own words flow, I journal them. When I’m stuck, the words of David serve to help express my feelings and serve as a reminder of our firm foundation: who God is and what He has done.  

Invitations to Pray 
I want to invite you to take these weeks of Lent as an opportunity to become a prayer pupil. How can you take the posture of a learner to hone your personal practices of prayer? Experiment with writing down your prayers each morning, or choose a Psalm to repeat throughout the day. 

And in following with the generosity of David and of Linda in offering their hearts of prayer as an encouragement to others, I offer you a prayer I wrote during Lent 2020. Reach towards Christ, whether with your own words or those of who came before, and may you see that He is reaching towards you! 

Morning Prayer  
by Cailey Morgan 

Poke through 
Turn up 
Interrupt 

Weave your compassion and grace  
Through the fabric of my day 
Remind me to pray  
Infuse what I say 
And actions I take 
With Your healing way 

So that I stay 
Planted 
Rooted 
Grounded 
Not stuck but transfixed 
Can’t move until You move 

Can’t stop until You return 
Abundant life like liquid gold 
Dripping through Your cupped hands as 
You run toward us 
Each drop falling like water 
Like fire 
Dissolving a hole between 
Heaven 
and  
Earth 

Oh to catch a glimpse 
Oh to be a glimpse 

Inspiration respirate on me 
On us 
Spirit of Power You renew 
Refresh 
Revive 
Re-enliven with Your Word 

Another sunrise another surge 
Another rebirth 
Faithful Father 
Making all things new 

Re-Lent

By Joell Haugan

Again we find ourselves immersed in the Lent season where we set aside something (often time, or fasting of various types) and replace it with some directed meditation in preparation of Good Friday and Easter. It is a powerful yearly spiritual exercise that is often lost on evangelicals—myself included.

Then I thought about the word “relent” and wondered if there was a connection of some kind. Turns out the root word is different, but that doesn’t prevent me from making a connection anyway!

Relent, of course, means to give in and become less aggressive while conceding the point. So, in an argument, the person who relents is the one who finally says “OK, you are right, I give up.” In a March storm (which all of Canada seems to be getting) the wind finally relents, stops and is replaced by placid (and often beautiful) calm.

Obviously, Christians often need to relent with God and concede to Him the point (whatever it may be). We often need to drop our defensive, aggressive stance of stubbornness and let God be in charge of life….again and again.

I often wonder if churches need to relent too. I wonder if the Holy Spirit is actually prompting churches, attempting to get us to see the harvest right in our own neighbourhoods instead of ignoring those very people that God has plopped us in the middle of. Prompting us to become churches that participate in Kingdom tasks beyond our own siloed (only our little group) jobs. Prompting churches to express God’s love in concrete ways in our cities/towns/areas instead of just assuming they will “get it.” And perhaps He’s prompting our churches to multiplying our ministries to new towns and new neighbourhoods instead of us trying get more people to drive further to our one location.

What is God trying to say to you? To your particular gathering of the saints which we call Church?

Maybe this Lent we can relent to God’s prompting in our personal and our corporate church lives.

Joell.